“How to Tighten Vagina After Giving Birth?” - Tips to Ease into a Postpartum Sex Life?

“How to Tighten Vagina After Giving Birth?” - Tips to Ease into a Postpartum Sex Life?

In the postpartum period lasting for the six weeks after your child's birth, sex will be the last thing on your mind. Those all-night feedings, crying fits at 2 am, and the need for constant attention will leave you feeling frazzled for sure.

Apart from the lack of energy, you also have the physical limitations to consider. Sex, even very gentle sex, is still going to involve some movement in the hips and groin, involving your core muscles and the pelvic floor.

We hate to break it to you, but that's going to hurt a bit.

But love hurts, right? No, it doesn't; the key to getting back into some form of sexual intimacy is to avoid pain. C-section procedures involve the doctor cutting deep into the pelvic floor muscle to get to the baby in the womb.

That's a serious invasive surgery, involving plenty of trauma to muscle tissues and ligaments. If you have a natural birth, you experience severe stretching of the perineum, the area between the vagina and anus. Some women might have the perineum tear, requiring stitching and repair.

Childbirth pain lingers for days after the delivery, requiring the use of icepacks and witch hazel pads to reduce swelling and pain symptoms.

However, at the 10-week mark, you and your partner will be feeling like you got this, and it's time to start getting busy in the bedroom again.

Pain is your guide, and when you feel sore, you stop, hats it, no exceptions. Now we have the golden rule out of the way; there are a few strategies you can use to improve your healing and get you back to regular sexual activity and intimacy levels.

 

Fast-track Your Recovery with Red Light Therapy

The best way to accelerate recovery from childbirth back to pre-pregnancy levels is to begin rebuilding the structures in the pelvic floor and vagina. There are a few ways to accomplish this goal. The first is with the use of physiotherapy in the form of Kegels.

Kegels involve flexing the muscles of the pelvic floor in routine movements periodically during the day. Kegels help you gain control over the pelvic floor, stopping an overactive bladder and poorly-positioned uterus from causing the symptoms of incontinence.

The second strategy on how to tighten vagina after giving birth involves using a red light device. We manufacture the MyElleVibe LED therapy tools for vaginal rejuvenation, and they produce remarkable effects.

These devices feature an ergonomic design, fitting inside the vagina. At the front, you find three LEDs spreading light into the vaginal walls and the cervix. Red light penetrates deep into the tissues and the ligaments inside the pelvic floor, helping boost collagen production while restoring the pelvis's structural integrity. Red light also boosts cell communication and ATP creation in mitochondria, increasing energy levels, and metabolism.

All you need is 12-minutes every other day with a red light device, and you'll dramatically reduce your healing time.

 

Get Your Doctors Approval

You can start using a red light device as soon as it feels comfortable to insert it into the vagina. So, starting at around 4-weeks might be the best average guideline. However, before you do, speak to your doctor about the therapy and get the green light.

After another four to six weeks of red light therapy and Kegels, get a checkup with your doctor. They'll check the shape and size of your uterus to ensure its returned to pre-pregnancy size. If you pass the checkup, then you're good to go in the bedroom.

However, just because the doctor gives you the go-ahead for sex, doesn't mean that you have to stop your red light therapy and Kegel training. Keep it up, and you'll find sex becomes more enjoyable, and you end your incontinence symptoms.

 

Take Back Control

After having one baby, you're probably going to want to take some time off until you think about having another child. Unless you're thinking about getting right back into getting pregnant, then getting back on the pill can be a good idea after you stop breastfeeding.

Getting back on your birth control introduces exogenous hormones back into your body with the medication. Therefore, if you're feeling symptoms of postpartum depression, the drug can lift your mood and get you back into feeling intimate with your partner again.,

 

Lubrication is Key

Use lube in the first few sessions until you get back into the swing of things. Purchase a water-based formula from an online retailer.

We also should mention that you use regular water-based lubes for sexual intercourse.

Extra-virgin coconut oil is a cheap alternative to lube. Make sure you purchase a raw, unfiltered version. This oil contains enzymes that provide an anti-microbial effect on harmful bacteria.

The oil soothes and protects during sex, and a little goes a long way. When you get the oil, it comes in a solid form at room temperature. However, rubbing a bit between your fingers loosens the oil, making an excellent natural moisturizer.

Get in the Mood

For the first sex session back from pregnancy and birth, get in the mood, and make a date night at home out of the situation.

Dress up, put on makeup, set the lighting, and make things special. Getting your endorphins flowing again helps to reestablish communication and contact with your partner after nearly a year of your life's craziest biological experience.

When you start to get busy – remember that communication is key and adhere to the pain principle. The moment that you feel any pain, you stop. Don't feel like you must continue to please your partner.

 

Position Yourselves Properly

Experiment slowly and find a position that places as little pressure on your pelvis as possible. Keep the pressure off the area around your stitches. Stick to positions like you being on top, or lying on your side. Go slow, and stop at the first sign of any pain.

Read more

Recovery and Nutrition Tips for Postpartum Mothers

Recovery and Nutrition Tips for Postpartum Mothers

What to Do about Menopause Urine Leakage

What to Do about Menopause Urine Leakage

How to Control Your Bladder and Stop Incontinence Postpartum

How to Control Your Bladder and Stop Incontinence Postpartum